Enhanced chemiluminescence as an indicator of air pollution

Authors


Correspondence

Richard Bryan Cartwright, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. Email: rbc823@bham.ac.uk

Abstract

Investigations were conducted to determine the pollution levels of air condensate and rain samples using the enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL) reaction. Air condensate samples were initially collected from roadside sites, non-roadside sites, smoking-exposed sites and non-smoking-exposed sites using an automatic dew collector. Rainwater was also collected throughout the sampling period. Samples were subsequently analysed using the ECL reaction, and pollution levels (Eclox Units) were calculated. Air condensate samples collected from roadside- and smoking-exposed sites generally had higher pollution levels than those from non-roadside- and non-smoking-exposed sites. Samples from both smoking-exposed and traffic-exposed sites generally had higher pollution levels than rainwater. Finally, in samples collected from roadside-exposed sites and rainwater, the main polluting constituents were determined to be cationic/anionic components. In samples collected from smoking-exposed sites, the main polluting constituents were determined to be organic components.

Ancillary