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Keywords:

  • agriculture;
  • farm youth;
  • injury trends;
  • rural;
  • sex

Abstract

Purpose: To estimate the number and rate of on-farm injuries to youth living on farms in the United States by sex from 1998 to 2006 and compare the trends in youth injury by sex.

Methods: Data from 4 childhood agricultural injury surveys for the years 1998, 2001, 2004, and 2006 were analyzed using a Poisson regression model utilizing generalized estimating equations. Rate ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated from the model, which compared the estimated rates of injury in 2001, 2004, and 2006 to the estimated rate of injury in the baseline year, 1998.

Results: There was an overall decline in the estimated number and rate of injuries to youth living on farms from 1998 to 2006, with a linear decline of the rate ratios for all youth on farms that was found to be significant. By sex, the trend in injury rate ratios for male youth significantly declined, while the trend for female youth for the same time period initially increased then returned to the baseline. Nonhomogeneity in trends by age group, work versus nonwork injury, and source of injury was also identified.

Conclusion: Additional surveillance is needed to determine if injury trends to youth living on farms will continue to differ by sex. More detailed data on exposure to hazards for these youth by sex are needed to determine what factors are associated with these disparate injury trends and to design and implement effective interventions to further reduce injuries to youth living on farms.