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Keywords:

  • Accommodated resistance;
  • muscular strenght;
  • quadriceps peak torque

The adaptive responses to 12 weeks of accommodated resistance training were compared in females (n= 11) and males (n= 11). They performed four to five sets of six maximum bilateral coupled concentric and eccentric quadriceps muscle actions at 1.05 rad s-1 three times per week. Uni- and bilateral concentric and eccentric peak torque at different angular velocities (0.52, 1.57 and 2.62 rad s-1), three repetition maximum half-squat and vertical jump height were measured before and after training.

Both groups displayed marked increases (P < 0.05) in concentric and eccentric peak torque at all angular velocities. The relative increases (P < 0.05) in unilateral concentric (26 vs. 26%) and eccentric (28 vs. 36%) peak torque across speeds were similar in females and males. The corresponding increases (P < 0.05) in bilateral concentric and eccentric peak torque across speeds were 20 vs. 28% and 24 vs. 39% respectively. The three repetition maximum half-squat (20 vs. 25%) and vertical jump height (10 vs. 8%) increased (P < 0.05) equally in females and males.

These results suggest that the overall increases in concentric and eccentric peak torque and functional strength, in response to short-term accommodated resistance training, occur at a rate that is independent of sex. The torque-velocity relationship, however, appears to change in males suggesting a relatively greater enhancement of maximum voluntary force in the slow-speed, high-force region.