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‘Finding home’: a grounded theory on how older people ‘find home’ in long-term care settings

Authors


Adeline Cooney
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Aras Moyola
National University of Ireland, Galway
Galway
Ireland
Telephone: +353 91 493580
E-mail: adeline.cooney@nuigalway.ie

Abstract

cooney a. (2011) ‘Finding home’: a grounded theory on how older people ‘find home’ in long-term care settings. International Journal of Older People Nursing7, 188–199
doi: 10.1111/j.1748-3743.2011.00278.x

Background.  A link between residents ‘feeling at home’ in long-term care facilities and ‘quality of life’ is emerging in the literature. Few studies, however, have focused on what helps residents to find a home in long-term care settings. This study aimed to fill this gap.

Aim.  This study aimed to understand older peoples’ perceptions of ‘being at home’ in long-term care settings and the factors that influence these perceptions.

Design.  Grounded theory guided the study design. Residents (n = 61) living in public or private long-term care settings were interviewed using unstructured interviews.

Findings.  Four categories were identified as critical to finding a home in long-term care settings: ‘continuity’, ‘preserving personal identity’, ‘belonging’ and ‘being active and working’. ‘Finding Home’ was conceptualised as the core category. The potential to ‘find home’ was influenced by mediating and facilitating/constraining factors.

Conclusions.  The Theory of Finding Home was generated from the data. This theory describes the factors critical to ‘finding home’ in long-term care settings.

Implications for practice.  The Theory of Finding Home gives insight into what matters to older people living in long-term care settings. Strategies to help generate a feeling of home in long-term care settings are shared.

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