Extrahepatic biliary atresia in a border collie

Authors

  • C. Schulze,

    1. Departments of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, PO Box 80. 158, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • J. Rothuizen,

    1. *Clinical Sciences of companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, PO Box 80. 158, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • F. J. van Sluijs,

    1. *Clinical Sciences of companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, PO Box 80. 158, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • H. A. W. Hazewinkel,

    1. *Clinical Sciences of companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, PO Box 80. 158, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • T. S. G. A. M. van den Ingh

    1. Departments of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, PO Box 80. 158, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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Abstract

Progressive lameness and leg pain were the predominant clinical signs in a 17-week-old male border collie presented for examination. On clinical investigation, extrahepatic cholestasis in association with rickets due to inadequate vitamin D resorption was diagnosed. The dog was treated parenterally with vitamin D and a cholecystoduodenostomy was performed. At 25 days postsurgery the lameness had resolved and bone structure was radio graphically normal. However, at six weeks postsurgery, the dog's condition deteriorated rapidly and euthanasia was finally performed at eight weeks postsurgery. At postmortem examination, Toxocara canis nematodes were found to have invaded the biliary system via the anastomosis between the gallbladder and duodenum, causing biliary and hepatic toxocariasis. The cause of the primary extrahepatic cholestasis was atresia of the common bile duct at the hepatic end. The liver tissue showed microscopic lesions of chronic extrahepatic cholestasis as well as acute inflammation associated with the nematode invasion. There was no postmortem evidence of bone lesions. Extrahepatic biliary atresia is extremely rare in animals and has not been described before in dogs. In contrast, it represents the most common cause of congenital cholestasis in children, occurring in approximately one per 10, 000 to 15, 000 live births.

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