Effect of NSAID administration on creatinine clearance in healthy dogs undergoing anaesthesia and surgery

Authors

  • S. F. Forsyth,

    1. Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
    Search for more papers by this author
  • W. G. Guilford,

    1. Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
    Search for more papers by this author
  • D. U. Preiffer

    1. Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
    Search for more papers by this author
    • 2

      Department of Farm Animal and Equine Medicine Studies, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms. Potters Bar, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA


Abstract

Thirty healthy male dogs were randomly assigned to receive carprofen (4 mg/kg intravenously), ketoprofen (2 mg/kg intravenously) or saline (0.2 ml/kg intravenously) at induction of anaesthesia for castration surgery. A routine castration was undertaken and a buccal mucosal bleeding time was assessed at the completion of surgery. Twenty-four hours after surgery a 24–hour endogenous creatinine clearance study was undertaken. Buccal mucosal bleeding time was not significantly different between the three groups. Creatinine clearance was significantly lower (P ≤ 0.01) in the two groups of dogs that received a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug compared with that in the dogs that received sterile saline. There was no significant difference between the carprofen and ketoprofen groups with respect to creatinine clearance.

Ancillary