Thyroid hormone abnormalities and outcome in dogs with non-thyroidal illness

Authors

  • C. T. Mooney,

    1. University of Glasgow Veterinary School, Bearsden Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1QH
      C. T. Mooney and R. E. Shiel’s current address: School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
      R. M. Dixon’s current address: Vets Now Ltd, 1 Blue Central, Pitreavie Drive, Dunfermline, Fife KY11 8US
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  • R. E. Shiel,

    1. University of Glasgow Veterinary School, Bearsden Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1QH
      C. T. Mooney and R. E. Shiel’s current address: School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
      R. M. Dixon’s current address: Vets Now Ltd, 1 Blue Central, Pitreavie Drive, Dunfermline, Fife KY11 8US
    Search for more papers by this author
  • R. M. Dixon

    1. University of Glasgow Veterinary School, Bearsden Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1QH
      C. T. Mooney and R. E. Shiel’s current address: School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
      R. M. Dixon’s current address: Vets Now Ltd, 1 Blue Central, Pitreavie Drive, Dunfermline, Fife KY11 8US
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors of this article were in receipt of a Petsavers Grant to support aspects of their clinical research.

Abstract

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Objectives: To document thyroid hormone abnormalities in dogs with non-thyroidal illness and identify markers of prognostic value.

Methods: Circulating total and free thyroxine, total triiodothyronine and thyrotropin concentrations were measured in 196 dogs with non-thyroidal illness. Clinical signs, previous medications and outcome were recorded in each case. Data were analysed to determine endocrine prognostic factors, and to document the prevalence of thyroid hormone abnormalities.

Results: Total triiodothyronine, and total and free thyroxine concentrations were decreased in 75·9, 34·7 and 4·5 per cent of cases, respectively. Dogs which were euthanased had significantly decreased total triiodothyronine, and total and free thyroxine concentrations compared with those which made a full recovery. Total triiodothyronine concentrations were significantly lower in dogs that were euthanased compared with those which made a partial recovery.

Clinical Significance: Thyroid hormone concentrations may be used as prognostic indicators in dogs with non-thyroidal illness. Low triiodothyronine syndrome may be more common in dogs than previously recognised.

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