Long-term results of transarticular pinning for surgical stabilisation of coxofemoral luxation in 20 cats

Authors

  • T. R. Sissener,

    1. Calgary Animal Referral and Emergency Centre Animal Hospital, 7140 12th Street SE, Calgary, Alberta T2H 2Y4, Canada
      *Davies Veterinary Specialists, Manor Farm Business Park, Higham Gobion, Hertfordshire SG5 3HR
      The Queen’s Veterinary School Hospital, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES
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  • R. G. Whitelock,

    1. Calgary Animal Referral and Emergency Centre Animal Hospital, 7140 12th Street SE, Calgary, Alberta T2H 2Y4, Canada
      *Davies Veterinary Specialists, Manor Farm Business Park, Higham Gobion, Hertfordshire SG5 3HR
      The Queen’s Veterinary School Hospital, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES
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  • S. J. Langley-Hobbs

    1. Calgary Animal Referral and Emergency Centre Animal Hospital, 7140 12th Street SE, Calgary, Alberta T2H 2Y4, Canada
      *Davies Veterinary Specialists, Manor Farm Business Park, Higham Gobion, Hertfordshire SG5 3HR
      The Queen’s Veterinary School Hospital, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of this study was to describe initial and long-term results of open reduction and transarticular pinning for treatment of coxofemoral luxations in cats.

Methods: Cats were treated by open reduction and transarticular pinning for coxofemoral luxation over a five year period at two institutions. Follow-up assessment included orthopaedic examination, radiography and owner questionnaires.

Results: Twenty cats were included in the study (14 males and six females). One cat was affected bilaterally. Mean time to follow-up was 21 months. Seventeen joints were stabilised with a 1·6 mm pin, three with 2·0 mm pins and a 1·2 mm pin was used in the remaining joint. An Ehmer sling was not utilised in any case. All transarticular pins except one were removed (mean 3·5 weeks), with all hips still in reduction The overall success rate was 77 per cent, with two reluxations and one resorbed femoral head noted on radiographs of 13 joints followed long term. All 20 owners reported good to excellent long-term functional outcome for their cats.

Clinical Significance: Results from this study indicate that transarticular pinning for stabilisation of coxofemoral luxation in cats can provide a good long-term outcome without sacrificing the integrity of the coxofemoral joint.

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