Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging sequences in dogs with multi-focal intracranial disease

Authors

  • G. B. Cherubini,

    1. Dick White Referrals Six Mile Bottom, Cambridgeshire, CB8 0UH
      *Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
      †Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA
      ‡Animal Health Trust, Centre for Small Animal Studies, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7UU
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  • S. R. Platt,

    1. Dick White Referrals Six Mile Bottom, Cambridgeshire, CB8 0UH
      *Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
      †Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA
      ‡Animal Health Trust, Centre for Small Animal Studies, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7UU
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  • S. Howson,

    1. Dick White Referrals Six Mile Bottom, Cambridgeshire, CB8 0UH
      *Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
      †Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA
      ‡Animal Health Trust, Centre for Small Animal Studies, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7UU
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  • E. Baines,

    1. Dick White Referrals Six Mile Bottom, Cambridgeshire, CB8 0UH
      *Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
      †Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA
      ‡Animal Health Trust, Centre for Small Animal Studies, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7UU
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  • D. C. Brodbelt,

    1. Dick White Referrals Six Mile Bottom, Cambridgeshire, CB8 0UH
      *Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
      †Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA
      ‡Animal Health Trust, Centre for Small Animal Studies, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7UU
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  • R. Dennis

    1. Dick White Referrals Six Mile Bottom, Cambridgeshire, CB8 0UH
      *Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
      †Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA
      ‡Animal Health Trust, Centre for Small Animal Studies, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7UU
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  • This paper was presented at the 19th ESVN/ECVN Annual Congress, September 29 to 30, 2006.

Abstract

Objectives: To compare the value of different magnetic resonance sequences in the detection of brain lesions in dogs with multi-focal intracranial neurolocalised lesions and abnormal cisternal cerebrospinal fluid analysis.

Methods: T2-weighted, T1-weighted, T1-weighted-Gd, FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) images of 73 dogs with multi-focal intracranial localised lesions were reviewed retrospectively. Control dogs (19) were selected on the basis of normal neurological examination, magnetic resonance images and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Two board-certified radiologists blindly reviewed the magnetic resonance images. Magnetic resonance sequence sensitivities were compared using the chi-squared test and logistic regression, accounting for clustering at the patient level. Statistical significance was set at the 5 per cent level.

Results: The FLAIR sequence was found to have the highest sensitivity (84 per cent, 61 of 73), followed by T2-weighted (63 per cent, 46 of 73), T1-weighted postcontrast (62 per cent, 45 of 73) and T1-weighted (23 per cent, 17 of 73) (P<0·001). FLAIR images were 106·1 times (95 per cent confidence interval 25·2 to 447·5) more likely to correctly identify cerebrospinal fluid-positive patients than T1-weighted, 6·4 times (95 per cent confidence interval 2·2 to 18·2) than T1-weighted postcontrast and 5·8 times (95 per cent confidence interval 2·0 to 16·4) than T2-weighted. FLAIR identified 14 per cent of cases that were classified as normal based on the three others sequences.

Clinical Significance: Routine use of FLAIR sequence should be encouraged in dogs undergoing a brain magnetic resonance imaging and probably more specifically in cases of suspected inflammatory brain disease.

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