Multi-centre assessment of mycotic rhinosinusitis in dogs: a retrospective study of initial treatment success (1998 to 2008)

Authors

  • M. Sharman,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
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  • A. Paul,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
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  • D. Davies,

    1. Adelaide Veterinary Specialist and Referral Centre, 102 Magill Road, Norwood, South Australia 5067, Australia
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  • B. MacKay,

    1. Veterinary Specialist Services, Hometown, Cnr Lexington and Logan Road, Underwood, Queensland 4119, Australia
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  • G. Swinney,

    1. Veterinary Specialist Centre, 14-20 Dehli Road, North Ryde, New South Wales 2113, Australia
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    • Dr G. Swinney's current address is the University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Sydney, 65 Parramatta Road, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia

  • V. Barrs,

    1. University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Sydney, 65 Parramatta Road, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia
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  • A. Arteaga,

    1. University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Sydney, 65 Parramatta Road, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia
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  • I. D. Robertson,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
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  • C. Mansfield

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
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Abstract

Objectives: To retrospectively review the first treatment response of dogs with mycotic rhinosinusitis to commonly utilised treatment techniques.

Methods: Medical records of dogs treated for mycotic rhinosinusitis were obtained retrospectively via a manual review of the clinical databases of six veterinary referral centres for the period of January 1998 to June 2008, and first treatment outcome was evaluated. Historical and clinicopathological findings were also reviewed to evaluate their impact on treatment success or failure.

Results: There was no significant difference in first treatment outcome between treatment groups (P=0·21). When all topical treatments were considered together (n=85), 39 dogs (45·8%) had a successful first treatment. Initial treatment success was associated with a younger age (56·3 versus 75·8 months; P=0·02) and was 2·7 times more likely in dogs with unilateral disease, although this was not significant (P=0·07). Adjunctive therapy with systemic antifungal agents was associated with treatment failure (PÄ0·01). Fifty-nine dogs (69·4%) responded successfully following multiple treatments.

Clinical Significance: Treatment of mycotic rhinosinusitis remains challenging, and multiple treatments are frequently required for adequate treatment. Reasons for first treatment failure are likely multifactorial in origin, making it difficult to predict those dogs that are likely to have a superior prognosis, regardless of the treatment type used.

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