Clotrimazole and enilconazole distribution within the frontal sinuses and nasal cavity of nine dogs with sinonasal aspergillosis

Authors

  • M. Sharman,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Murdoch University, South St, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
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    • M. Sharman’s and C. Mansfield’s current address is Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Highway, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia

  • Z. Lenard,

    1. Veterinary Imaging Centre, Perth Veterinary Specialists, 305 Selby St, Osborne Park, Western Australia 6017, Australia
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  • G. Hosgood,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Murdoch University, South St, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
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  • C. Mansfield

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Murdoch University, South St, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
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    • M. Sharman’s and C. Mansfield’s current address is Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Highway, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia


  • This study was presented in part as an abstract at the 2010 ACVIM Forum, Anaheim, California, USA.

Abstract

Objectives: Multiple topical treatments are often required for clinical cure of mycotic rhinosinusitis in dogs. The objective of this study was to describe the distribution and retention of enilconazole and clotrimazole solutions using a temporary trephination protocol.

Methods: Nine client-owned dogs diagnosed with mycotic rhinosinusitis between March 2008 and December 2009 were prospectively enrolled and were sequentially allocated to receive treatment with either clotrimazole (1% in polyethylene glycol) or enilconazole (10% solution), after imaging and rhinoscopic assessment. Both frontal sinuses were trephined, debrided and flushed with saline. Infusion was administered via frontal sinuses with dogs in sternal recumbency and computed tomography (CT) performed 5 minutes after completion. Distribution was scored 1 to 4 at the canine tooth, premolar 4, cribriform plate and frontal sinus on both sides, for a maximum score of 32.

Results: Distribution of antifungal agents to all regions of the nasal cavity and frontal sinuses was achievable, but varied considerably. Retention was poor in 10 of 18 regions assessed.

Clinical Significance: Distribution of antifungal agents within the frontal sinuses is achievable using temporary trephination; however, distribution is variable and retention is often poor.

Ancillary