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Foraging ecology of a local wild bee community in an abandoned Satoyama system in Kanazawa, Central Japan

Authors

  • Ramadhani Eka PUTRA,

    1.  Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
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  • Koji NAKAMURA

    1.  Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
    2.  Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
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Ramadhani Eka Putra, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192, Japan. Email: ramadhaniputra@yahoo.com

Abstract

Satoyama is a traditional land management system in Japan that emphasizes the importance of a harmonious relationship between humans and their environment. It has been in a state of abandonment and destruction since the late 1960s. In 2000, the Japanese government initiated a new environment policy encouraging the use of Satoyama in biodiversity reservation areas. Before the initiation of active restoration works, an assessment of the potential of the Satoyama system is needed. To assess this potential, a study that focused on the foraging ecology of wild bees in a small abandoned Satoyama terraced paddy was carried out from June to October 2003. A total of 372 foraging bees belonging to 35 species in nine families was collected: two species of social bee (Apis cerana and Bombus diversus) and two of solitary bee (Lasioglossum japonicum and Lasioglossum ohei) dominated. The foraging activities of wild bees were highly influenced by the requirement of food for the colony and the active time of solitary bees. In the study, most wild bees showed a strong preference for abundant flowering plant species that produced a large number of flowers (Achyranthes japonica and Polygonum thunbergii). The results showed that an abandoned Satoyama system was an agricultural system that benefited pollinating bees. Careful and planned restoration practices to increase the diversity of foraging resources, microenvironment diversity and potential nesting areas for wild bees are needed to improve the ability of the Satoyama system to support more diverse and abundant wild bee populations.

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