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References

  • 1
    S. M. Wolf et al., “Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36, no. 2 (2008): 219248; see also. J. Illes et al., “Incidental Findings in Brain Imaging Research,”Science 311, no. 5762 (2006): 783–784.
  • 2
    Id. (Illes et al.).
  • 3
    J. Illes et al., “Discovery and Disclosure of Incidental Findings in Neuroimaging Research,” Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 20, no. 5 (2004): 743747; A. Mamourian, “Incidental Findings on Research Functional MR Images: Should We Look?”American Journal of Neuroradiology 25, no. 4 (2004): 520–522.
  • 4
    See Illes et al., supra note 1; id. (Illes et al.); J. Illes et al., “Ethical and Practical Considerations in Managing Incidental Findings in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging,”Brain & Cognition 50, no. 3 (2002): 358–365.
  • 5
    L. Belsky and H. S. Richardson, “Medical Researchers' Ancillary Clinical Care Responsibilities,” BMJ 328, no. 7454 (2004): 14941496; H. S. Richardson and L. Belsky, “The Ancillary-Care Responsibilities of Medical Researchers: An Ethical Framework for Thinking About the Clinical Care That Researchers Owe Their Subjects,”Hastings Center Report 34, no. 1 (2004): 25–33.
  • 6
    S. Bovio et al., “Prevalence of Adrenal Incidentaloma in a Contemporary Computerized Tomography Series,” Journal of Endocrinological Investigation 29, no. 4 (2006): 298302.
  • 7
    T. L. Beauchamp and J. F. Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 5th ed. ( New York : Oxford University Press, 2001).
  • 8
    E. H. Morreim, “The Clinical Investigator as Fiduciary: Discarding a Misguided Idea,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 33, no. 3 (2005): 586598.
  • 9
    See Beauchamp and Childress, supra note 7, at 168–170.
  • 10
    T. M. Scanlon, What We Owe to Each Other ( Cambridge : Harvard University Press, 1980).
  • 11
    Id., at 224.
  • 12
    Id. .
  • 13
    M. Zwitter et al., “Professional and Public Attitudes towards Unsolicited Medical Intervention,” BMJ 318, no. 7178 (1999): 251253.
  • 14
    See Beauchamp and Childress, supra note 7, at 5-7.
  • 15
    Spaulding v. Zimmerman, 116 N.W.2d 704 (Minn. 1962).
  • 16
    See Belsky and Richardson (“Medical Researchers' Ancillary Clinical Care Responsibilities”), supra note 5; Richardson and Belsky (“The Ancillary-Care Responsibilities of Medical Researchers”), supra note 5.
  • 17
    See Belsky and Richardson (“Medical Researchers' Ancillary Clinical Care Responsibilities”), supra note 5.
  • 18
    See Richardson and Belsky (“The Ancillary-Care Responsibilities of Medical Researchers”), supra note 5.
  • 19
    Id., at 32.
  • 20
    R. I. Grossman and J. L. Bernat, “Incidental Research Imaging Findings: Pandora's Costly Box,” Neurology 62, no. 6 (2004): 849850.
  • 21
    A. Kleinschmidt, “Incidental Neuroimaging Findings: Lessons from Brain Research in Volunteers,” Current Opinion in Neurology 20, no. 4 (2007): 387389.
  • 22
    Id. .
  • 23
    M. P. Kirschen et al., “Subjects' Expectations in Neuroimaging Research,” Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 23, no. 2 (2006): 205209.
  • 24
    D. I. Shalowitz and F. G Miller, “Disclosing Individual Results of Clinical Research: Implications of Respect for Participants,” JAMA 294, no. 6 (2005): 737740.
  • 25
    See Illes et al., supra note 1.
  • 26
    P. S. Appelbaum et al., “False Hopes and Best Data: Consent to Research and the Therapeutic Misconception,” Hastings.