Age distribution of lactating New Zealand sea lions: Interannual and intersite variation

Authors

  • Simon J. Childerhouse,

    1. Department of Conservation,
      Marine Conservation Unit,
      P.O. Box 10-420, Wellington, New Zealand
      and
      Department of Marine Science,
      University of Otago,
      P.O. Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand
      E-mail: simon.childerhouse@aad.gov.au
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    • 1

      Present address: Australian Antarctic Division, Channel Highway, Kingston, Tasmania 7050, Australia.

  • Stephen M. Dawson,

    1. Department of Marine Science,
      University of Otago,
      P.O. Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand
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  • Elisabeth Slooten,

    1. Department of Zoology,
      University of Otago,
      P.O. Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand
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  • David J. Fletcher,

    1. Department of Mathematics and Statistics,
      University of Otago,
      P.O. Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand
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  • Ian S. Wilkinson

    1. Marine Conservation Unit,
      Department of Conservation,
      P.O. Box 10-420, Wellington, New Zealand
      and
      Department of Environment and Climate Change,
      Coffs Harbor, NSW, Australia
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    • 1

      Present address: Australian Antarctic Division, Channel Highway, Kingston, Tasmania 7050, Australia.


Abstract

The age distribution of 865 lactating New Zealand sea lions (NZSLs; Phocarctos hookeri) was investigated over 3 yr (1999–2001) at two breeding colonies, Sandy Bay and Dundas Island, New Zealand. Lactating females were aged between 3 and 26 yr with a maximum observed age of 28 yr. The mean age of lactating females was 11.1 (SE = 0.16) yr. Age distributions peaked at ages 8 and 9 with a strong skew toward younger females, likely indicative of maximum recruitment into the breeding population by this age. There were significant intersite differences in age structure and also significant interannual differences in age distributions at Sandy Bay, but not at Dundas Island. Given that the two colonies are less than 10 km apart, have some interchange, and share foraging areas, these differences are surprising. However, the colony at Dundas Island is almost four times larger than Sandy Bay and may therefore be less sensitive to demographic or environmental stochasticity. That age distributions of NZSLs vary significantly over small temporal and spatial scales has important implications for the extrapolation of data from one site or year to the population level, and hence for their management and conservation.

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