Reducing the effects of work–family conflict on job satisfaction: the kind of commitment matters

Authors

  • Filomena Buonocore,

    1. Department of Business Management, University of Naples Parthenope
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  • Marcello Russo

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Management and Strategy, Rouen Business School
      Professor Marcello Russo, Department of Management and Strategy, Rouen Business School, 1 rue de Maréchal Juin, BP215, 76825 Mont Saint Aignan Cedex, France. Email: mrs@rouenbs.frj
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Professor Marcello Russo, Department of Management and Strategy, Rouen Business School, 1 rue de Maréchal Juin, BP215, 76825 Mont Saint Aignan Cedex, France. Email: mrs@rouenbs.frj

Abstract

The way in which organisational commitment influences the relationship between work–family conflict and job satisfaction is a question that has produced contradictory results. We address this issue by developing and testing a model that integrates role conflict theory and major research on organisational commitment, to elucidate the consequences that time-, strain- and behaviour-based conflict have on job satisfaction. The research is based on data collected among Italian nurses, and the results show that time- and strain-based conflict are negatively related to job satisfaction. In addition, affective commitment moderates the relationship between strain-based conflict and job satisfaction, whereas normative commitment moderates the relationship between time-based conflict and job satisfaction. We discuss the implications of these results for theory and practice.

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