Quality of life assessment after non-laser endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy

Authors


A. Ho, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne NE7 7DN, UK. Tel.: +44(0)191 213 7635; fax: +44(0)191 223 1246; e-mail: allantpho@hotmail.com

Abstract

Objective:  There has been a lack of patient-centred evidence in the Otolaryngology literature, that non-laser endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy improves the quality of life of patients. Many studies demonstrate successful outcomes based on non-validated subjective patient reporting. The aim of this survey was to evaluate the impact of non-laser endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy on the quality of life of patients using a validated questionnaire, the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI).

Design:  Prospective non-randomised case series.

Setting:  Secondary otorhinolaryngology–ophthalmology centre, single centre.

Participants:  Sixty-five consecutive patients undergoing non-laser endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy were asked to complete a questionnaire at their follow-up clinic appointment. All patients had a minimum of 9 months follow-up.

Main outcome measures:  A consultant ophthalmologist reviewed each patient six months after surgery and recorded the outcomes as ‘cure’, ‘better’, ‘no change’ or ‘worse’. We defined ‘success’ as cured or better. ‘Failure’ suggests no improvement or worsening epiphora. The validated 18-item GBI was used.

Results:  Fully completed questionnaires were received from 55 patients. Mean total GBI scores were +34 for successful non-laser endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy and −19 for failed non-laser endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (Mann–Whitney z = 3.8, P < 0.001).

Conclusion:  Successful non-laser endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy does confer significant quality of life improvement.

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