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Environmental Contaminants and Dietary Factors in Endometriosis

Authors


Address for correspondence: Warren G. Foster, Ph.D., Director, Reproductive Biology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, HSC-3N52, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5. Voice: 905-525-9140, ext. 22822; fax: 905-524-2911; fosterw@mcmaster.ca.

Abstract

Abstract: Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. The etiology of this disease remains elusive, but is clearly influenced by genetic, immune, and endocrine factors. Exposure to environmental contaminants has recently been added to the list of potential factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis. The objective of this paper is to review the weight of the evidence from hospital-based case-control studies and animal experiments for an association between exposure to environmental contaminants and endometriosis.

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