New insights into T cell biology and T cell-directed therapy for autoimmunity, inflammation, and immunosuppression

Authors

  • Scott M. Steward-Tharp,

    1. Molecular Immunology and Inflammation Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    2. Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
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  • Yun-jeong Song,

    1. Autoimmunity Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Richard M. Siegel,

    1. Autoimmunity Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • John J. O'Shea

    1. Molecular Immunology and Inflammation Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
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Address for correspondence: Scott Steward-Tharp, Molecular Immunology and Inflammation Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, RM 13C103, Bethesda, MD 20892. Fax: 301-480-6372. stewardtharpsm@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

T cell-directed therapies have become mainstays in the management of various autoimmune diseases and organ transplantation. The understanding of T cell biology has expanded greatly since the development of most agents currently in use. Here we discuss important recent discoveries pertaining to T helper cell differentiation, lineage commitment, and function. Within this context, we examine existing T cell-directed therapies, including new agents being evaluated in clinical and preclinical studies. We also use recent findings to speculate on novel targets.

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