Genes, brain, and behavior: development gone awry in autism?

A report on the 23rd Annual International Symposium of the Center for the Study of Gene Structure and Function

Authors

  • Michael J. Lewis,

    1. Psychology
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Jason B. Dictenberg wrote the first part of this report dealing with the morning session, and Michael J. Lewis covered the second part or afternoon session.

  • Jason B. Dictenberg

    1. Biological Sciences, Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York, New York
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Jason B. Dictenberg wrote the first part of this report dealing with the morning session, and Michael J. Lewis covered the second part or afternoon session.


Addresses for correspondence: Michael J. Lewis, Department of Psychology, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065. mlewis@genectr.hunter.cuny.edu; Jason B. Dictenberg, Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065. dictenberg@genectr.hunter.cuny.edu

Abstract

Autism and its highly variable symptomology were the themes of the 23rd Annual International Symposium of the Center for the Study of Gene Structure and Function at Hunter College in New York City, held 15 January 2010. The meeting explored the extensive research on autism from several perspectives—integrating research on genetics, neuroscience, and behavior—from researchers presenting new and innovative approaches to understanding the autism spectrum. Early diagnosis, intervention, and genetics were major themes because they are seen as essential areas in which progress is needed before the rise in numbers of cases of autism throughout the world, which some describe as approaching an epidemic, can be stemmed. Several genetic, neurobiological, and behavioral markers of autism have been identified that may ultimately provide the basis for early identification, and that presently define the key areas requiring intensive intervention.

Ancillary