Core issues in the economics of biodiversity conservation

Authors


  • Preferred citation: Clement A. Tisdell. 2011. Core issues in the economics of biodiversity conservation in “Ecological Economics Reviews.” Robert Costanza, Karin Limburg & Ida Kubiszewski, Eds. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 1219: 99–112.

Address for correspondence: Clement A. Tisdell, Professor Emeritus, School of Economics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia. c.tisdell@economics.uq.edu.au

Abstract

Economic evaluations are essential for assessing the desirability of biodiversity conservation. This article highlights significant advances in theories and methods of economic evaluation and their relevance and limitations as a guide to biodiversity conservation; considers the implications of the phylogenetic similarity principle for the survival of species; discusses consequences of the Noah's Ark problem for selecting features of biodiversity to be saved; analyzes the extent to which the precautionary principle can be rationally used to support the conservation of biodiversity; explores the impact of market extensions, market and other institutional failures, and globalization on biodiversity loss; examines the relationship between the rate of interest and biodiversity depletion; and investigates the implications of intergenerational equity for biodiversity conservation. The consequences of changes in biodiversity for sustainable development are given particular attention.

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