• Open Access

Type 2 diabetes in South Asians: similarities and differences with white Caucasian and other populations

Authors

  • Unjali P. Gujral,

    Corresponding author
    • Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, Laney Graduate School, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • R. Pradeepa,

    1. Madras Diabetes Research Foundation and Dr. Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, WHO Collaborating Centre for Noncommunicable Diseases, Prevention and Control, Chennai, India
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  • Mary Beth Weber,

    1. Hubert Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • K.M. Venkat Narayan,

    1. Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, Laney Graduate School, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
    2. Hubert Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • V. Mohan

    1. Madras Diabetes Research Foundation and Dr. Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, WHO Collaborating Centre for Noncommunicable Diseases, Prevention and Control, Chennai, India
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Corrigendum for Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 2013. 1281: 51–63 Volume 1299, 98, Article first published online: 24 September 2013

Address for correspondence: Unjali P. Gujral, M.P.H., Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, 1462 Clifton Road, Suite 314, Atlanta, GA 30322. unjali.gujral@emory.edu

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. While all ethnic groups are affected, the prevalence of T2DM in South Asians, both in their home countries and abroad, is extremely high and is continuing to rise rapidly. Innate biological susceptibilities coupled with rapid changes in physical activity, diet, and other lifestyle behaviors are contributing factors propelling the increased burden of disease in this population. The large scope of this problem calls for investigations into the cause of increased susceptibility and preventative efforts at both the individual and population level that are aggressive, culturally sensitive, and start early. In this review, we outline the biological and environmental factors that place South Asians at elevated risk for T2DM, compared with Caucasian and other ethnic groups.

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