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Abstract

Compensatory growth and changes in biochemical composition, hematocrit and body condition indices of juvenile flounder Paralichthys olivaceus were assessed during starvation and after refeeding. Twenty juvenile fish were stocked into each 200-L flow-through tank to give five treatments with three replicates per treatment: control group fish (C) were hand fed to apparent satiation twice daily for 8 wk, whereas the Sl, S2, S3, and S4 fish were hand fed to apparent satiation twice daily for 7, 6, 5, and 4 wk after 1, 2, 3, and 4 wk of starvation, respectively. During starvation, weight decreased linearly with periods of feed deprivation up to 3 wk. Survival was not significantly different among treatments. At the end of the feeding trial, weight gain (g/fish) and specific growth rate (SGR) of flounder in S2 was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those of fish in S3 or S4, but not significantly different from those of fish in C or Sl. Feed consumption of flounder (g/fish) was proportional to duration of feeding except for that of fish in S2. Feed efficiency ratio (FER) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) values for flounder in S2 were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those for fish in C, but not significantly different from those for fish in Sl, S3, or S4. During starvation, hepatosomatic index (HSI) and lipid content of flounder without liver decreased with periods of feed deprivation. However, HSI and condition factor (CF) for flounder in S2 were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those for fish in Sl, S3, S4 and C except for CF in Sl at the end of the feeding trial. Proximate composition of flounder without the liver was not significantly different among treatments at the end of the feeding trial. In considering above results, juvenile flounder achieved compensatory growth with up to 2-wk feed deprivation. Compensatory growth of flounder fed for 6 wk after 2-wk feed deprivation was well supported by improvement in SGR, FER, and PER. HSI could be a good index to monitor changes in body condition during starvation and after refeeding.