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Alternative Protein Sources in Artificial Diets for New Zealand's Black-Footed Abalone, Haliotis iris, Martyn 1784, Juveniles

Authors

  • Che-Huang Tung,

    1. School of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1020, New Zealand
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  • Andrea C. Alfaro

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1020, New Zealand
      Corresponding author.
    Search for more papers by this author

Corresponding author.

Abstract

Growth and health parameters were tested in juvenile New Zealand black-footed abalone, Haliotis iris, fed nine diets containing different protein sources (white and red fishmeal, blood meal, meat and bone meal, casein, soybean concentrate, wheat gluten, maize gluten, and Spirulina powder) over a 5-mo period. The growth parameters measured included shell length, total animal weight, and soft body and gonad weights. The health indicators included survival, goblet cell counts, and epithelium thickness of the tentacle region. Proximate analyses and amino acid and fatty acid profiles were also determined on the diets, soft body tissues and shell materials to evaluate the nutrient contents (diet and animal) and requirements (animal). Measurements of soft body, gonad, and shell growth parameters indicated that white and red fishmeals generally result in better growth. Animals fed blood meal had the lowest survival rates and crude protein contents. Spirulina produced animals with the heaviest shells and soybean treatments produced animals with the highest gonad to soft body ratios. Significantly lower acid/basic amino acid ratios were found in fishmeal diets, indicating that animals fed fishmeal may incorporate more aragonite than calcite in their shells.

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