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Abstract

Understanding children's lives within the various spaces, places, and environments they inhabit is critical to making their worlds safer, facilitating their participatory roles in society, and implementing policies relevant to their realities. While the children's geographies scholarship is rapidly growing, much of the research is still centred on children in the ‘West’, with less focus on those in developing countries. Within the Third World, the Caribbean itself is slightly marginalised. This article uses the island-nation of Jamaica as a case study within the Caribbean region, examining some of the areas of interest in research on children's environments, and reflecting upon progress made in the range of methodological and theoretical approaches brought to the research agenda. It suggests prospective directions for future research to further a critical approach to this expanding field, both within Jamaica and the wider region. It ends by briefly raising some ethical issues for consideration, arising from advancing a research agenda with children at its fore.