• Open Access

Inter- and intraspecies transmission of canine influenza virus (H3N2) in dogs, cats, and ferrets

Authors

  • Hyekwon Kim,

    1. Department of Veterinary Medicine Virology Lab, College of Veterinary Medicine, and School of Agricultural Biotechnology, BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
    2. Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon, Korea.
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Daesub Song,

    1. Viral Infectious Disease Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejon, Korea.
    2. University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea.
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Hyoungjoon Moon,

    1. Research Unit, Green Cross Veterinary Products, Yong-in, Korea.
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  • Minjoo Yeom,

    1. Research Unit, Green Cross Veterinary Products, Yong-in, Korea.
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  • Seongjun Park,

    1. Department of Veterinary Medicine Virology Lab, College of Veterinary Medicine, and School of Agricultural Biotechnology, BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
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  • Minki Hong,

    1. Viral Infectious Disease Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejon, Korea.
    2. University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea.
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  • Woonseong Na,

    1. Viral Infectious Disease Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejon, Korea.
    2. University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea.
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  • Richard J. Webby,

    1. Division of Virology, Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.
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  • Robert G. Webster,

    1. Division of Virology, Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.
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  • Bongkyun Park,

    1. Department of Veterinary Medicine Virology Lab, College of Veterinary Medicine, and School of Agricultural Biotechnology, BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
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  • Jeong-Ki Kim,

    1. Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Korea University, Yeongi-gun, Chungnam, Korea.
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  • Bokyu Kang

    1. Research Unit, Green Cross Veterinary Products, Yong-in, Korea.
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Jeong-Ki Kim, Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Korea University, Yeongi-gun, Chungnam 339-700, Korea. E-mail: jkfrancis@korea.ac.kr and Bokyu Kang, Research Unit, Green Cross Veterinary Products, Yong-in 449-903. Korea, E-mail: suyun@gcvp.co.kr

Abstract

Background  The emergence of zoonotic viruses in domestic animals is a significant public health concern. Canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N2 is a virus that can infect companion animals and is, therefore, a potential public health concern.

Objective  This study investigated the inter- and intraspecies transmission of CIV among dogs, cats, and ferrets, under laboratory conditions, to determine whether transmission of the virus was possible between as well as within these domestic animal species.

Method  The transmission routes for inter- and intraspecies transmission were airborne and direct contact, respectively. Transmission was conducted through intranasal infection of dogs followed by exposure to either cats or ferrets and by comingling infected and naïve animals of the same species.

Results  The interspecies transmission of CIV H3N2 via airborne was only observed from dogs to cats and not from dogs to ferrets. However, direct intranasal infection of either cats or ferrets with CIV could induce influenza-like clinical signs, viral shedding, and serological responses. Additionally, naïve cats and ferrets could be infected by CIV via direct contact with infected animals of the same species.

Conclusion  Cats appear to be another susceptible host of CIV H3N2, whereas ferrets are not likely natural hosts. The molecular-based mechanism of interspecies and intraspecies transmission of CIV H3N2 should be further studied.

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