Physical Study of Minced Fish Muscle with a White-Grape By-Product Added as an Ingredient

Authors

  • I. Sánchez-Alonso,

    1. Authors Sánchez-Alonso and Borderías are with Inst. del Frío (CSIC), José Antonio Nováis 10, 28040, Madrid, Spain. Author Solas is with Dept. de Biología Celular, Univ. Complutense, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040, Madrid, Spain. Direct inquiries to author Sánchez-Alonso (E-mail: isblsa@hotmail.com).
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  • M.T. Solas,

    1. Authors Sánchez-Alonso and Borderías are with Inst. del Frío (CSIC), José Antonio Nováis 10, 28040, Madrid, Spain. Author Solas is with Dept. de Biología Celular, Univ. Complutense, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040, Madrid, Spain. Direct inquiries to author Sánchez-Alonso (E-mail: isblsa@hotmail.com).
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  • A.J. Borderías

    1. Authors Sánchez-Alonso and Borderías are with Inst. del Frío (CSIC), José Antonio Nováis 10, 28040, Madrid, Spain. Author Solas is with Dept. de Biología Celular, Univ. Complutense, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040, Madrid, Spain. Direct inquiries to author Sánchez-Alonso (E-mail: isblsa@hotmail.com).
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Abstract

ABSTRACT:  Functional properties of a white grape dietary fiber concentrate (WGDF) obtained from wine industry residues were determined with a view to their use as potential functional ingredient in seafood products. The main features of interest of WGDF are that it is a natural product containing high concentrations of dietary fiber (DF) with a high-soluble DF (sDF)/insoluble DF (iDF) ratio and associated bioactive compounds; as such it is considered potentially suitable for use as dietary fiber in the enrichment of foods. WGDF was therefore added to minced fish muscle (MFM) of horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) to take advantage of its technological properties, and also to enrich a food product that is a functional product in itself but does not contain dietary fiber. WGDF was added (2% and 4%) to MFM, which was stored for 6 mo at –20 °C, and a further lot was vacuum packed. Physical and mechanical properties, sensory and color analyses, microscopy, and electrophoretic profiles were all done in samples every month. The results indicate that WGDF had good functional properties, high water and oil retention capacity, and considerable swelling properties, which would make it useful as a natural ingredient in foods. The addition of WGDF to MFM augmented aggregation of myofibrillar proteins in the course of frozen storage, although electrophoretic profiles were very similar in samples with and without WGDF. The addition of WGDF to MFM made samples softer and less springy and cohesive. SEM showed good dispersion of WGDF in MFM but the matrix was more discontinuous than in the control. Water retention was significantly enhanced when WGDF was added, and the cooking yield improved. In sensory evaluation, samples containing 2% of WGDF scored highest in overall acceptance as compared with the control. Vacuum packing did not significantly affect the properties considered during frozen storage.

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