Advanced Glycosylation End Products and Nutrition—A Possible Relation with Diabetic Atherosclerosis and How to Prevent It

Authors

  • A. Xanthis,

    1. Authors Xanthis, Hatzitolios and Tatola are with First Propaideutiki Internal Medicine Clinic. Author Koliakos is with Biochemistry Dept., AHEPA Univ. Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, Greece. Direct inquiries to author Xanthis (E-mail: andyxanthis@yahoo.gr).
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  • A. Hatzitolios,

    1. Authors Xanthis, Hatzitolios and Tatola are with First Propaideutiki Internal Medicine Clinic. Author Koliakos is with Biochemistry Dept., AHEPA Univ. Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, Greece. Direct inquiries to author Xanthis (E-mail: andyxanthis@yahoo.gr).
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  • G. Koliakos,

    1. Authors Xanthis, Hatzitolios and Tatola are with First Propaideutiki Internal Medicine Clinic. Author Koliakos is with Biochemistry Dept., AHEPA Univ. Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, Greece. Direct inquiries to author Xanthis (E-mail: andyxanthis@yahoo.gr).
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  • V. Tatola

    1. Authors Xanthis, Hatzitolios and Tatola are with First Propaideutiki Internal Medicine Clinic. Author Koliakos is with Biochemistry Dept., AHEPA Univ. Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, Greece. Direct inquiries to author Xanthis (E-mail: andyxanthis@yahoo.gr).
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Abstract

ABSTRACT:  Advanced glycosylation end product (AGE) levels are elevated in diabetic patients and may contribute to the excessive cardiovascular disease in this population, promoting oxidant stress and chronic vascular inflammation. AGEs in people with diabetes mellitus are formed mainly by protein and lipid glucosylation in an environment of chronic hyperglycemia and also by prolonged thermal food processing (diet derived AGEs). This brief review summarizes current literature about food derived AGEs and their relationship with diabetic vascular disease and supports the importance of low AGE diet as an essential preventive or therapeutic intervention against atheromatosis progress.

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