Get access

Fresh Pasta Quality as Affected by Enrichment of Nonstarch Polysaccharides

Authors

  • C.S. Brennan,

    1. Author Brennan is with Massey Univ., Inst. of Food Nutrition and Human Health, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Authors Brennan and Tudorica are with Plymouth Univ., School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth, U.K. Direct inquiries to author Brennan (E-mail: c.s.brennan@massey.ac.nz).
    Search for more papers by this author
  • C.M. Tudorica

    1. Author Brennan is with Massey Univ., Inst. of Food Nutrition and Human Health, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Authors Brennan and Tudorica are with Plymouth Univ., School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth, U.K. Direct inquiries to author Brennan (E-mail: c.s.brennan@massey.ac.nz).
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

ABSTRACT:  Nonstarch polysaccharides (NSPs), both soluble and insoluble, were added to pasta doughs at levels of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10% levels. The cooking and textural characteristics of the pastas were evaluated using a range of analytical techniques. Generally, NSP addition was found to increase the cooking losses, and reduce the protein and starch contents of the pasta. This effect was dependent on the level of NSP added and also the type (soluble or insoluble). Pasta firmness was generally reduced in relation to the level of NSP addition, although some gel-forming NSPs resulted in higher firmness values. Pasta stickiness, adhesiveness, and elasticity were also affected. The results indicate that careful selection of NSP addition is needed to ensure optimum textural and cooking characteristics in NSP enriched pasta products.

Ancillary