Cross-Cultural Comparisons among the Sensory Characteristics of Fermented Soybean Using Korean and Japanese Descriptive Analysis Panels

Authors

  • L. Chung,

    1. Author L. Chung is with Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Inha Univ., Nam-gu, Yonghyun-dong 253, Incheon 402-751, South Korea. Author S.-J. Chung is with Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Seoul Women's Univ., Nowon-gu, Gongneung2-dong 126, Seoul 139-774, South Korea. Direct inquiries to author S.-J. Chung (E-mail: sjchung@swu.ac.kr).
    Search for more papers by this author
  • S.-J. Chung

    1. Author L. Chung is with Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Inha Univ., Nam-gu, Yonghyun-dong 253, Incheon 402-751, South Korea. Author S.-J. Chung is with Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Seoul Women's Univ., Nowon-gu, Gongneung2-dong 126, Seoul 139-774, South Korea. Direct inquiries to author S.-J. Chung (E-mail: sjchung@swu.ac.kr).
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

ABSTRACT:  One of the most important initial steps in exporting a food product to another country from the R&D perspective is to describe and translate the sensory characteristics of a food product appropriately into the language of the target country. The objectives of this study were to describe and compare the sensory characteristics of Korean and Japanese style fermented soybean products, and to cross-culturally compare the lexicons of the identical product generated by the Korean and Japanese panelists. Four types of Korean and 4 types of Japanese style fermented soybean consisting of whole bean type and paste type were analyzed. Ten Korean and 9 Japanese panelists were recruited in Korea. Two separate descriptive analyses were conducted, with the panelists differing in their country of origin. Each group was trained, developed lexicon, and conducted descriptive analysis independently. Analysis of variance and various multivariate analyses were applied to delineate the sensory characteristics of the samples and to compare the cross-cultural differences in the usage of lexicon. The Korean and Japanese panelists generated 48 and 36 sensory attributes, respectively. Cross-cultural consensus was shown for evaluating the whole bean type fermented soybean and white miso, which were relatively distinctive samples. However, for the less distinctive samples, the panelists tend to rate higher in negative attributes for the fermented soybeans that originated from the other country. The Japanese panelists grouped the samples by their country of origin and soy sauce flavor was the main attribute for cross-cultural differentiation. However, the Korean panelists did not make a cross-cultural distinction among the samples.

Ancillary