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Keywords:

  • emulsion;
  • phosphatidylcholine;
  • photooxidation;
  • singlet oxygen quenching

ABSTRACT:  Effects of phosphatidylcholine (PC) on the oxidation of oil by singlet oxygen in a W/O microemulsion and an emulsion food model containing tocopherol-stripped sunflower oil (TSSO) have been studied. The W/O microemulsion consisted of methylene chloride, butanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate with PC (0, 250, 1000 ppm) and TSSO (0, 3.3, 16.5, 33 mg/mL). Production of singlet oxygen in the microemulsion was done chemically with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of sodium molybdate, and indirectly evaluated by rubrene oxidation at A529. The emulsion food model consisted of TSSO, distilled water, and xanthan gum with addition of 250 ppm PC and 4 ppm chlorophyll b, and was placed at 25 °C under fluorescent lights (1700 lux) for 24 h. The oxidation of TSSO was determined by thin-layer chromatography and values of conjugated dienoic acid (CDA) and peroxides (POV). PC significantly decreased the oxidation of rubrene and TSSO in the W/O microemulsion, but its content was decreased to approximately one-half by a 20-min reaction, indicating its degradation. This clearly shows that PC acted as an antioxidant via chemical quenching of singlet oxygen in the W/O microemulsion. A possible synergism between PC and TSSO was observed in singlet oxygen quenching in the microemulsion. PC also significantly decreased the chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of TSSO in the emulsion food model, possibly by singlet oxygen quenching. This study clearly suggested that PC be used as an antioxidant to improve the lipid oxidative stability of an emulsion food containing chlorophyll under light.