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Changes in the Composition of Raw Tea Leaves from the Korean Yabukida Plant during High-Temperature Processing to Pan-Fried Kamairi-Cha Green Tea

Authors

  • Mendel Friedman,

    1. Authors Friedman and Levin are with Western Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA 94710, U.S.A. Author Choi is with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Seowon Univ., 361-742, Mochung-dong, Heungduk-gu, Cheongju-city, Chungbuk, Korea. Authors Lee and Kozukue are with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Uiduk Univ., 780-713, Gangdong, Gyeongju, Gyongbuk, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Friedman (E-mail: Mendel.Friedman@ars.usda.gov).
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  • Carol E. Levin,

    1. Authors Friedman and Levin are with Western Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA 94710, U.S.A. Author Choi is with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Seowon Univ., 361-742, Mochung-dong, Heungduk-gu, Cheongju-city, Chungbuk, Korea. Authors Lee and Kozukue are with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Uiduk Univ., 780-713, Gangdong, Gyeongju, Gyongbuk, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Friedman (E-mail: Mendel.Friedman@ars.usda.gov).
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  • Suk-Hyun Choi,

    1. Authors Friedman and Levin are with Western Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA 94710, U.S.A. Author Choi is with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Seowon Univ., 361-742, Mochung-dong, Heungduk-gu, Cheongju-city, Chungbuk, Korea. Authors Lee and Kozukue are with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Uiduk Univ., 780-713, Gangdong, Gyeongju, Gyongbuk, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Friedman (E-mail: Mendel.Friedman@ars.usda.gov).
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  • Seung-Un Lee,

    1. Authors Friedman and Levin are with Western Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA 94710, U.S.A. Author Choi is with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Seowon Univ., 361-742, Mochung-dong, Heungduk-gu, Cheongju-city, Chungbuk, Korea. Authors Lee and Kozukue are with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Uiduk Univ., 780-713, Gangdong, Gyeongju, Gyongbuk, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Friedman (E-mail: Mendel.Friedman@ars.usda.gov).
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  • Nobuyuki Kozukue

    1. Authors Friedman and Levin are with Western Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA 94710, U.S.A. Author Choi is with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Seowon Univ., 361-742, Mochung-dong, Heungduk-gu, Cheongju-city, Chungbuk, Korea. Authors Lee and Kozukue are with Dept. of Food Service Industry, Uiduk Univ., 780-713, Gangdong, Gyeongju, Gyongbuk, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Friedman (E-mail: Mendel.Friedman@ars.usda.gov).
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Abstract

ABSTRACT:  To develop a better understanding of compositional changes occurring during the production of commercial teas, we determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) changes in ingredient levels during each of several manufacturing steps used to produce Kamairi-cha, a premium green tea. Kamairi-cha uses pan-frying instead of the usual blanching technique to inactivate the enzymes responsible for producing traditional black tea. The resulting tea lacks the characteristic bitterness of green tea, producing a green tea that is described as sweet tasting. The processing steps used to produce this pan-fried tea were as follows: 1st roasting, 1st rolling, 2nd roasting, 2nd rolling, 1st firing, and 2nd firing. The results show that during production at temperatures up to 300 °C, raw leaves lost (in percent) 97.3 water, 94 two chlorophylls, 14.3 seven catechins, and 2.75 caffeine. A separate analysis showed that the final product contained 21.67 mg/g dry wt of the biologically active amino acid theanine. The results of this 1st report on changes in individual catechins and other tea ingredients in tea leaves during pan-frying make it possible to select production conditions that maximize levels of beneficial tea ingredients. The possible significance of the results for the human diet is discussed.

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