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Application of Solid Phase-Microextraction (SPME) and Electronic Nose Techniques to Differentiate Volatiles of Sesame Oils Prepared with Diverse Roasting Conditions

Authors

  • Min Hee Park,

    1. Authors Park, Jeong, Yeo, and Lee are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Natl. Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743, Korea. Authors Son, Lim, Hong, and Noh are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's Univ., Seoul, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Lee (E-mail: jhlee@snut.ac.kr).
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  • Min Kyu Jeong,

    1. Authors Park, Jeong, Yeo, and Lee are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Natl. Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743, Korea. Authors Son, Lim, Hong, and Noh are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's Univ., Seoul, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Lee (E-mail: jhlee@snut.ac.kr).
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  • JuDong Yeo,

    1. Authors Park, Jeong, Yeo, and Lee are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Natl. Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743, Korea. Authors Son, Lim, Hong, and Noh are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's Univ., Seoul, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Lee (E-mail: jhlee@snut.ac.kr).
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  • Hee-Jin Son,

    1. Authors Park, Jeong, Yeo, and Lee are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Natl. Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743, Korea. Authors Son, Lim, Hong, and Noh are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's Univ., Seoul, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Lee (E-mail: jhlee@snut.ac.kr).
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  • Chae-Lan Lim,

    1. Authors Park, Jeong, Yeo, and Lee are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Natl. Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743, Korea. Authors Son, Lim, Hong, and Noh are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's Univ., Seoul, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Lee (E-mail: jhlee@snut.ac.kr).
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  • Eun Jeung Hong,

    1. Authors Park, Jeong, Yeo, and Lee are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Natl. Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743, Korea. Authors Son, Lim, Hong, and Noh are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's Univ., Seoul, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Lee (E-mail: jhlee@snut.ac.kr).
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  • Bong-Soo Noh,

    1. Authors Park, Jeong, Yeo, and Lee are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Natl. Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743, Korea. Authors Son, Lim, Hong, and Noh are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's Univ., Seoul, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Lee (E-mail: jhlee@snut.ac.kr).
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  • JaeHwan Lee

    1. Authors Park, Jeong, Yeo, and Lee are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Natl. Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743, Korea. Authors Son, Lim, Hong, and Noh are with Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's Univ., Seoul, Korea. Direct inquiries to author Lee (E-mail: jhlee@snut.ac.kr).
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Abstract

Abstract:  Headspace volatiles of sesame oil (SO) from sesame seeds roasted at 9 different conditions were analyzed by a combination of solid phase microextraction (SPME)-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), electronic nose/metal oxide sensors (MOS), and electronic nose/MS. As roasting temperature increased from 213 to 247 °C, total headspace volatiles and pyrazines increased significantly (P < 0.05). Pyrazines were major volatiles in SO and furans, thiazoles, aldehydes, and alcohols were also detected. Roasting temperature was more discrimination factor than roasting time for the volatiles in SO through the principal component analysis (PCA) of SPME-GC/MS, electronic nose/MOS, and electronic nose/MS. Electronic nose/MS showed that ion fragment 52, 76, 53, and 51 amu played important roles in discriminating volatiles in SO from roasted sesame seeds, which are the major ion fragments from pyrazines, furans, and furfurals. SO roasted at 213, 230, and 247 °C were clearly differentiated from each other on the base of volatile distribution by SPME-GC/MS, electronic nose/MOS, and electronic nose/MS analyses.

Practical Application:  The results of this study are ready to apply for the discriminating samples using a combinational analysis of volatiles. Not only vegetable oils prepared from roasting process but also any food sample possessing volatiles could be targets for the SPME-GC/MS and electronic nose assays. Contents and types of pyrazines in sesame seed oil could be used as markers to track down the degree of roasting and oxidation during oil preparation.

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