Partial Replacement of Pork Back-Fat by Vegetable Oils in Burger Patties: Effect on Oxidative Stability and Texture and Color Changes during Cooking and Chilled Storage

Authors

  • J.G. Rodríguez-Carpena,

    1. Author Rodríguez-Carpena is with Faculty of Veterinary, Autonomous Univ. of Nayarit, México. Authors Morcuende and Estévez are with Animal Production and Food Science, Univ. of Extremadura, Spain. Direct inquiries to author Estévez (E-mail: mariovet@unex.es).
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  • D. Morcuende,

    1. Author Rodríguez-Carpena is with Faculty of Veterinary, Autonomous Univ. of Nayarit, México. Authors Morcuende and Estévez are with Animal Production and Food Science, Univ. of Extremadura, Spain. Direct inquiries to author Estévez (E-mail: mariovet@unex.es).
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  • M. Estévez

    1. Author Rodríguez-Carpena is with Faculty of Veterinary, Autonomous Univ. of Nayarit, México. Authors Morcuende and Estévez are with Animal Production and Food Science, Univ. of Extremadura, Spain. Direct inquiries to author Estévez (E-mail: mariovet@unex.es).
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Abstract

Abstract:  The present study was aimed to examine the impact of partial back-fat replacement (50%) by avocado (A), sunflower (S), and olive (O) oil on the chemical composition, oxidative stability, color, and texture of porcine burger patties (10% fat) subjected to oven cooking (170 °C/18 min) and chilling (+ 4 °C/15 d). The addition of vegetable oils caused a significant reduction of saturated fatty acids and a concomitant enrichment in unsaturated fatty acids. The incorporation of vegetable oils to porcine patties caused a significant reduction of TBARS formed as a result of cooking and the subsequent chilling. The usage of vegetable oils as back-fat replacers had no impact on the formation of protein carbonyls. Porcine patties with A- and O-patties displayed a more favorable ratio between volatiles contributing to rancidity and those contributing pleasant odor notes. Treated and control patties underwent similar discoloration during processing. The usage of vegetable oils and particularly, avocado and olive oils, as back-fat replacers, could be an interesting strategy to improve the nutritional and technological properties of porcine patties.

Practical Application:  The present study highlights the potential nutritional and technological benefits of replacing animal fat by vegetable oils in porcine patties subjected to cooking and chilling. The industrial application of vegetable oils in processed meat products would meet the current consumers’ interest towards healthier food products. In addition, the usage of avocado oil would contribute to boost the avocado industry by providing an additional value to a by-product of great biological significance.

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