Benzophenone Photoprobes for Phosphoinositides, Peptides and Drugs

Authors

  • Glenn D. Prestwich,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Chemistry, University at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA
    2. Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA
      *Department of Medicinal Chemistry, The University of Utah, 308 Skaggs Hall, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. Fax: 801–581–9053; E-mail: gprestwich@deans.pharm.utah.edu.
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  • György Dormán,

    1. Departments of Chemistry, University at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA
    2. Pharmacology, University at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA
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  • John T. Elliott,

    1. Physiology and Biophysics, University at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA
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  • Dale M. Marecak,

    1. Departments of Chemistry, University at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA
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  • Anu Chaudhary

    1. Departments of Chemistry, University at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA
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*Department of Medicinal Chemistry, The University of Utah, 308 Skaggs Hall, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. Fax: 801–581–9053; E-mail: gprestwich@deans.pharm.utah.edu.

Abstract

Benzophenones (BP) and related aryl ketone photophores have become established as the photoactivatable group of choice for high-efficiency covalent modification of hydrophobic regions of binding proteins, including enzymes and receptors that recognize peptide hormones, (oligonucleotides and nucleosides, phosphoinositides, inositol polyphosphates and a wide variety of therapeutic molecules. This review presents the advantages of BP as pho-toafnnity labels and provides specific examples from the last 3 years of applications of BP-containing ligands used in biochemistry.

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