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Phototoxicity in Human Lens Epithelial Cells Promoted by St. John's Wort

Authors

  • Yu-Ying He,

    1. Laboratory of Chemistry and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC
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  • Colin F. Chignell,

    1. Laboratory of Chemistry and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC
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  • David S. Miller,

    1. Laboratory of Chemistry and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC
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  • Usha P. Andley,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
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  • Joan E. Roberts

    Corresponding author
    1. Fordham University, Department of Natural Sciences, New York, NY
      *To whom correspondence should be addressed: Fordham University, Department of Natural Sciences, 113 West 60th Street, Room 813, New York, NY 10023, USA. Fax: 212-636-6754; e-mail: jroberts@fordham.edu
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  • Posted on the website on 15 September 2004.

*To whom correspondence should be addressed: Fordham University, Department of Natural Sciences, 113 West 60th Street, Room 813, New York, NY 10023, USA. Fax: 212-636-6754; e-mail: jroberts@fordham.edu

Abstract

St. John's Wort (SJW), an over-the-counter antidepressant, contains hypericin, which absorbs light in the UV and visible ranges and is phototoxic to skin. To determine if it also could be phototoxic to the eye, we exposed human lens epithelial cells to 0.1–10 μM hypericin and irradiated them with 4 J/cm2 UV-A or 0.9 J/cm2 visible light. Neither hypericin exposure alone nor light exposure alone reduced cell viability. In contrast, cells exposed to hypericin in combination with UV-A or visible light underwent necrosis and apoptosis. The ocular antioxidants lutein and N-acetyl cysteine did not prevent damage. Thus, ingested SJW is potentially phototoxic to the eye and could contribute to early cataractogenesis. Precautions should be taken to protect the eye from intense sunlight while taking SJW.

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