Effects of Low Power Laser Irradiation on Intracellular Calcium and Histamine Release in RBL-2H3 Mast Cells

Authors

  • Wen-Zhong Yang,

    1. Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
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  • Ji-Yao Chen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
    2. State Key Laboratory for Advanced Photonic Materials and Devices, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
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  • Ji-Tong Yu,

    1. Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
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  • Lu-Wei Zhou

    1. Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
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Corresponding author email: jychen@fudan.edu.cn (J. Y.Chen)

Abstract

Although laser irradiation has been reported to promote skin wound healing, the mechanism is still unclear. As mast cells are found to accumulate at the site of skin wounds we hypothesized that mast cells might be involved in the biological effects of laser irradiation. In this work the mast cells, RBL-2H3, were used in vitro to investigate the effects of laser irradiation on cellular responses. After laser irradiation, the amount of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) was increased, followed by histamine release, as measured by confocal fluorescence microscopy with Fluo-3/AM staining and a fluorescence spectrometer with o-phthalaldehyde staining, respectively. The histamine release was mediated by the increment of [Ca2+]i from the influx of the extracellular buffer solution through the cation channel protein, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4). The TRPV4 inhibitor, Ruthenium Red (RR) can effectively block such histamine release, indicating that TRPV4 was the key factor responding to laser irradiation. These induced responses of mast cells may provide an explanation for the biological effects of laser irradiation on promoting wound healing, as histamine is known to have multi-functions on accelerating wound healing.

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