Live Cell Surface Labeling with Fluorescent Ag Nanocluster Conjugates

Authors

  • Junhua Yu,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA
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  • Sungmoon Choi,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA
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  • Chris I. Richards,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA
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  • Yasuko Antoku,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA
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  • Robert M. Dickson

    Corresponding author
      *Corresponding author email: dickson@chemistry.gatech.edu (Robert M. Dickson)
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  • This invited paper is part of the Series: Applications of Imaging to Biological and Photobiological Systems.

*Corresponding author email: dickson@chemistry.gatech.edu (Robert M. Dickson)

Abstract

DNA-encapsulated silver clusters are readily conjugated to proteins and serve as alternatives to organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots. Stable and bright on the bulk and single molecule levels, Ag nanocluster fluorescence is readily observed when staining live cell surfaces. Being significantly brighter and more photostable than organics and much smaller than quantum dots with a single point of attachment, these nanomaterials offer promising new approaches for bulk and single molecule biolabeling.

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