Controlling the Formation of Silver Nanoparticles on Silica by Photochemical Deposition and Other Means

Authors

  • John Cody Vinci,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC
    2. College of Textiles, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
      Corresponding author email: jcvinci@buffalo.edu (Cody Vinci)
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    • Current address: Department of Chemistry, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

  • Piotr Bilski,

    1. Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC
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  • Richard Kotek,

    1. College of Textiles, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
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  • Colin Chignell

    1. Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC
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  • This invited paper is part of the Symposium-in-Print: “Phototoxicity of the Skin and Eye,” in honor of Dr. Colin Chignell.

Corresponding author email: jcvinci@buffalo.edu (Cody Vinci)

Abstract

Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) on silica were produced in aqueous solution by deposition of silver on colloidal silica in a small cuvette using radiation from a xenon-mercury lamp. Ag-NP were also synthesized on a much larger scale with low-level, long-term visible light irradiation for several months. In both cases, the nanoparticle production was monitored by the appearance of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at around 410 nm. The growth of the nanoparticles was directly related to the time exposed to radiation, which could be tracked spectrophotometrically over time. We also investigated the possibilities of rapid nanoparticle production without the assistance of radiation though silver oxide by adding alkali hydroxide, which is a relatively unexplored approach for syntheses of Ag-NP on silica. The SPR absorption of Ag-NP was used as a tool in evaluating the size and shape of the resulting nanoparticles along with dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy data. In order to better utilize and understand Ag-NP, we present various ways to control their production through initial concentration adjustments, irradiation effects, gravitational fractionation, sonication and silver oxide formation.

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