Predictors of Hypertension Control in a Diverse General Cardiology Practice

Authors

  • Adam D. DeVore MD,

    1. From the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA;1Section of Cardiology,2 Hypertensive Diseases Unit,3 Department of Medicine,University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL3; and Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Cardiovascular Division and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA4
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  • 1 Matthew Sorrentino MD,

    1. From the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA;1Section of Cardiology,2 Hypertensive Diseases Unit,3 Department of Medicine,University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL3; and Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Cardiovascular Division and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA4
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  • 2 Morton F. Arnsdorf MD,

    1. From the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA;1Section of Cardiology,2 Hypertensive Diseases Unit,3 Department of Medicine,University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL3; and Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Cardiovascular Division and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA4
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  • 2 R. Parker Ward MD,

    1. From the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA;1Section of Cardiology,2 Hypertensive Diseases Unit,3 Department of Medicine,University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL3; and Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Cardiovascular Division and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA4
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  • 2 George L. Bakris MD,

    1. From the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA;1Section of Cardiology,2 Hypertensive Diseases Unit,3 Department of Medicine,University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL3; and Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Cardiovascular Division and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA4
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  • and 3 Ron Blankstein MD 1,4

    1. From the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA;1Section of Cardiology,2 Hypertensive Diseases Unit,3 Department of Medicine,University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL3; and Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Cardiovascular Division and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA4
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Adam D. DeVore, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115
E-mail: adevore@partners.org

Abstract

J Clin Hypertens(Greenwich). 2010;12:570–577. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Factors influencing hypertension (HTN) control in the United States are not well understood. The authors utilized a newly designed survey instrument to interview patients presenting to a diverse, general cardiology practice at a tertiary care center in order to identify factors associated with HTN control. The study was completed in 154 participants, and 121 (78.6%) had HTN. Of those, 111 (91.7%) had awareness of HTN, and 72 (59.5%) had HTN control, defined as <140/90 mm Hg. In a multivariate analysis, race/ethnicity was not associated with HTN control, but private insurance (odds ratio [OR] 3.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25–9.28), nonsmoker status (OR 4.36, CI 1.22–15.51), and number of medications used (OR 1.32, CI 1.12–1.56) were associated with HTN control. Correct recognition of systolic blood pressure goal and knowledge of one’s current state of HTN control were also associated with control. In conclusion, in a general cardiology practice where patients had a high degree of healthcare access, race/ethnicity was not associated with HTN control, while type of insurance, nonsmoker status, and increased number of medications used were associated. In addition, 2 novel predictors of HTN control, recognition of systolic blood pressure goal and knowledge of HTN control, were identified that can be utilized in creating new HTN treatment interventions.

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