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J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2011;13:605–612.©2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

This paper reports the results of a clinical investigation to determine the sustainability of intervention effects to lower blood pressure (BP) that were obtained through a short-term education via home telemonitoring of BP and regular counseling by bilingual nurses during 1 year. A total of 359 middle-aged (40–64 years) Korean immigrants completed a 15-month intervention that consisted of 6-week behavioral education followed by home telemonitoring of BP and bilingual nurse telephone counseling for 12 months. The final analysis revealed a sharp increase in BP control rates sustained for more than 12 months. At baseline, only 30% of the sample achieved BP control (<140/90 mm Hg). After the initial education period (approximately 3 months), 73.3% of the participants had controlled BP levels. The levels of control were maintained and continuously improved during a 12-month follow-up period (83.2%, P<.001). These findings suggest that home telemonitoring of BP and tailored counseling are both useful tools to sustain or improve short-term education effects.