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We Reach a Milestone

  1. Top of page
  2. We Reach a Milestone
  3. The Hypertension Compendium
  4. Ongoing Features

A couple of years ago the Journal of Clinical Hypertension (JCH) decided to obtain an official measurement of its impact factor. Briefly, the impact factor is an index of how often a journal’s articles are cited in published work appearing in other journals. Obviously, the prestige that goes with a strong impact factor not only confirms a journal’s scientific and clinical value, but persuades an increasing number of leading researchers and experts to submit their best articles to the journal.

The happy news is that the 2010 impact factor for JCH—our first ever—was 2.26, putting it right in the mainstream of older, well-recognized journals in its field. This is an exciting moment in the Journal’s life!

JCH owes sincere thanks to the many authors who have sent us their important and quotable papers during recent years. But, beyond the contributions of the authors, JCH depends on its many reviewers, working hard and selflessly in the vital but anonymous process of peer review. These dedicated experts deserve much of the praise for our success.

We must also thank the staff at our publisher, Wiley-Blackwell—in particular, Liz Ferretti—for so effectively doing the painstaking work needed to get our journal considered for an impact factor and the stature that it brings.

The Hypertension Compendium

  1. Top of page
  2. We Reach a Milestone
  3. The Hypertension Compendium
  4. Ongoing Features

This issue of JCH helps exemplify why our articles are so often cited by others. In fact, this month’s publication is a focus issue, containing the Hypertension Compendium recently completed by the American Society of Hypertension. This compendium is made up of a highly authoritative series of up-to-date accounts of all the drug classes used in the contemporary treatment of hypertension. These papers, written by the leading experts in the field, individually and collectively represent an invaluable resource for clinicians as well as academicians in the field of hypertension therapy.

The distinguished editor of the compendium is Dr Keith C. Ferdinand, whose introduction to this series of papers provides an insightful overview of what to expect. The compendium is part of an ongoing series of state-of-the-art position papers commissioned by the Hypertension Writing Group of the American Society of Hypertension. Dr Barry Materson represented the Writing Group on this particular project and contributed strongly to the complex editorial work entailed in assembling these papers.

Ongoing Features

  1. Top of page
  2. We Reach a Milestone
  3. The Hypertension Compendium
  4. Ongoing Features

Earlier this year, the March issue of JCH was devoted entirely to the management of hypertension in patients with diabetes. Under the guest-editorship of Dr Yehuda Handelsman, a genuine who’s who of international experts in diabetes created a broad and highly readable set of references that will stand for years as the authoritative resource on this very common but challenging clinical problem.

The future looks just as exciting. Our Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Dr Daniel Lackland, is taking the lead in creating a monthly series of review articles for the Journal that will systematically explore cutting-edge issues in cardiovascular protection, including lipid disorders, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, and obesity as well as hypertension. I am delighted to report that Dr Lackland has received commitments to write these articles from the very top echelon of leaders in these fields. In fact, the very first of these reviews, by Dr John Chalmers on the subject of stroke prevention, appears in this issue of the Journal.

The top priorities of our Journal include its regular features: the analysis by Dr Jan Basile and Dr Michael Bloch of important recent articles published elsewhere in the medical literature, the series on Common Questions and Answers in Hypertension written by Dr Raymond Townsend and Dr Debbie Cohen, and the illustrative case studies contributed by Dr Joel Handler. These columns have been part of JCH for several years and each month are eagerly awaited by our readers.

Still, apart from our high-visibility focus issues, review articles and regular columns, we continue to depend on original research papers. We are delighted that so many articles defining cardiovascular risk and prevention, describing new approaches to patient care, or providing perspectives on public health issues and epidemiology have been published between the covers of JCH.

To all our authors, let me simply say: keep them coming!

Disclosure:  The authors received no honoraria for their contribution to this issue.