Transitions to adulthood in first-episode psychosis: a comparative study

Authors

  • Laurence Roy,

    Corresponding author
    1. Research Center, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal
    2. Clinique des Jeunes Psychotiques, Pavillon Albert-Prévost, Hôpital Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, (Pavillon Albert-Prvéost), Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    • School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jacqueline Rousseau,

    1. School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal
    2. Research Center, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Pierre Fortier,

    1. School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal
    2. Clinique des Jeunes Psychotiques, Pavillon Albert-Prévost, Hôpital Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, (Pavillon Albert-Prvéost), Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jean-Pierre Mottard

    1. Clinique des Jeunes Psychotiques, Pavillon Albert-Prévost, Hôpital Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, (Pavillon Albert-Prvéost), Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author

Corresponding author: Mrs Laurence Roy, École de réadaptation, Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7. Email: laurence.roy@umontreal.ca

Abstract

Aim

The first aim of this study is to compare attainment of five markers of transition to adulthood between young adults with first-episode psychosis and young adults without any psychopathology. The second aim is to examine if the association between age group and transition to adulthood is similar for individuals who experience first-episode psychosis versus those who do not.

Methods

Participants were 50 young adults with first-episode schizophrenia aged between 18 and 30 years old, and 50 volunteers without any psychopathology matched for sex and age. Participants were assessed with the Quality of Life Scale and a questionnaire on markers of transition to adulthood.

Results

Significant differences appear between the groups for three of the five markers of transition to adulthood, namely: residential/financial independence, educational attainment and involvement in a romantic relationship. The effect of age on several markers is significant for the comparison group only.

Conclusion

Rehabilitation interventions should be informed by a developmental perspective on community functioning for young adults with first-episode schizophrenia. Vocational rehabilitation should be extended to focus more extensively on supported education and not only on supported employment, and interventions targeting residential independence should be granted more attention.

Ancillary