• Open Access

Bacterial responses and interactions with plants during rhizoremediation

Authors

  • Ana Segura,

    Corresponding author
    1. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Professor Albareda 1, E-18008 Granada, Spain.
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  • Sara Rodríguez-Conde,

    1. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Professor Albareda 1, E-18008 Granada, Spain.
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  • Cayo Ramos,

    1. University of Malaga, Faculty of Sciences, Section of Genetics, Campus de Teatinos s/n, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
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  • Juan L. Ramos

    1. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Professor Albareda 1, E-18008 Granada, Spain.
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*E-mail ana.segura@eez.csic.es; Tel. (+34) 958 181600, ext. 114; Fax (+34) 958 135740.

Summary

With the increase in quality of life standards and the awareness of environmental issues, the remediation of polluted sites has become a priority for society. Because of the high economic cost of physico-chemical strategies for remediation, the use of biological tools for cleaning-up contaminated sites is a very attractive option. Rhizoremediation, the use of rhizospheric microorganisms in the bioremediation of contaminants, is the biotechnological approach that we explore in this minireview. We focus our attention on bacterial interactions with the plant surface, responses towards root exudates, and how plants and microbes communicate. We analyse certain strategies that may improve rhizoremediation, including the utilization of endophytes, and finally we discuss several rhizoremediation strategies that have opened ways to improve biodegradation.

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