• Open Access

Genetic tool development underpins recent advances in thermophilic whole-cell biocatalysts

Authors

  • M. P. Taylor,

    1. Institute for Microbial Biotechnology and Metagenomics (IMBM), University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa
    2. TMO Renewables Limited, 40 Alan Turing Road, The Surrey Research Park, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7YF, UK
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  • L. van Zyl,

    1. Institute for Microbial Biotechnology and Metagenomics (IMBM), University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa
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  • I. M. Tuffin,

    1. Institute for Microbial Biotechnology and Metagenomics (IMBM), University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa
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  • D. J. Leak,

    1. Division of Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, South Kensington SW7 2AZ, UK
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  • D. A. Cowan

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Microbial Biotechnology and Metagenomics (IMBM), University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa
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E-mail dcowan@uwc.ac.za; Tel. (+27) 21 959 2083; Fax (+27) 21 959 3505.

Summary

The environmental value of sustainably producing bioproducts from biomass is now widely appreciated, with a primary target being the economic production of fuels such as bioethanol from lignocellulose. The application of thermophilic prokaryotes is a rapidly developing niche in this field, driven by their known catabolic versatility with lignocellulose-derived carbohydrates. Fundamental to the success of this work has been the development of reliable genetic and molecular systems. These technical tools are now available to assist in the development of other (hyper)thermophilic strains with diverse phenotypes such as hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic properties, branched chain alcohol production and other ‘valuable bioproduct’ synthetic capabilities. Here we present an insight into the historical limitations, recent developments and current status of a number of genetic systems for thermophiles. We also highlight the value of reliable genetic methods for increasing our knowledge of thermophile physiology. We argue that the development of robust genetic systems is paramount in the evolution of future thermophilic based bioprocesses and make suggestions for future approaches and genetic targets that will facilitate this process.

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