• Open Access

Effect of substrate availability on nitrous oxide production by deammonification processes under anoxic conditions

Authors

  • Yvonne Schneider,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Sanitary Engineering and Waste Management (ISAH), Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, 30167 Hannover, Germany
      E-mail schneider@isah.uni-hannover.de; Tel. (+49)(0)511 762 2478; Fax (+49) (0)511 762 2881.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Maike Beier,

    1. Institute for Sanitary Engineering and Waste Management (ISAH), Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, 30167 Hannover, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Karl-Heinz Rosenwinkel

    1. Institute for Sanitary Engineering and Waste Management (ISAH), Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, 30167 Hannover, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author

E-mail schneider@isah.uni-hannover.de; Tel. (+49)(0)511 762 2478; Fax (+49) (0)511 762 2881.

Summary

Due to its high global warming potential, nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from wastewater treatment processes have recently received a high degree of attention. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of information regarding the microbiological processes leading to N2O production. In this study, two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors were operated with deammonification biomass to investigate the role of denitrification and the influence of substrate availability regarding N2O formation during the anoxic phase of deammonification. Three different operational phases were established: within the first phase conversion by anammox was favoured and after a transition phase, denitrification activity was promoted. Low nitrous oxide production was observed during stable operation aiming for anammox conversion. Pulsed inflow of the wastewater containing ammonium (NH4+) and nitrite (NO2-) led to increased N2O production rates. Within the period of denitrification as dominating nitrogen conversion process, the nitrous oxide concentration level was higher during continuous inflow conditions, but the reaction to pulsed inflow was less pronounced. The results indicated that denitrification was responsible for N2O formation from the deammonification biomass. Operational settings to achieve suppression of denitrification processes to a large extend were deducted from the results of the experiments.

Ancillary