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Abstract

The discursive study of racism has developed considerably over the last 20 years, and the body of work that has emerged from Australia and New Zealand is reviewed. The historical significance and importance of studying racism is discussed. The increasingly subtle face of racism argues for methods that are sensitive to these changes. Critical, discursive approaches are introduced following which the colonial history of both countries is outlined. Race talk in New Zealand and Australia is reviewed with several key summary points being identified. The review concludes with the suggestion that this work has gone some way toward living up to the disciplinary responsibilities we have as social psychologists in seeking a better understanding of the production of racism.