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Abstract

Work–family policies are commonly thought to aid parents in attending to their conflicting work and family responsibilities. Some scholars postulate that policies might detract from the gendered division of domestic labor, in which women take a greater responsibility for housework and childcare than men, while others expect that policies encourage women to maintain traditional family roles even while employed. A review of cross-national research in market economies shows that policies are not uniformly related to the gendered division of domestic labor, although parental leave offers the most promising avenue through which the gendered division of domestic labor may be diminished.