A RECONSIDERATION OF THE FAMILY-OF-ORIGIN SCALE

Authors

  • Leslie A. Gavin,

    1. National Jewish Center fof Immunology and Respiratory Medine Denver, CO
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Leslie A. Gavin, PhD, is Instructor, Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, and Instructor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Dever, CO 80206.

  • Frederick S. Wamboldt

    1. National Jewish Center fof Immunology and Respiratory Medine Denver, CO
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Frederick S. Wamboldt, MD, is Assistant Faculty Member, Department of Medicine, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80206.


  • The research described is spported in part by NIMH Physicaian Scientist Award K11-MH00607 to Dr. Wamboldt. The authors thank Dr. Karen Schmaling and four anonymous reviewers for their detailed and insightful comments on this manuscript. Send reprint, requents to Dr. Gavin, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiriatory medicine, 1400 Jackson Street, Denver, CO 80206.

Abstract

Recent studies published in this journal have debated the merits of the Family-of-Origin Scale (Hovestadt, Piercy, Anderson, Cochran, & Fine, 1985), a measure designed to tap the psychological health of one's family of origin. The present study is an investigation of the psychometric properties and overall utility of this measure. Although we agree with much of the recent criticism of the FOS, we suggest that with changes, primarily in interpretation, the instrument remains useful. Taking this measure as an example, we discuss problems inherent in the use of individual self-report data as indicators of family systems constructs.

Ancillary