PREDICTING 2-YEAR MARITAL SATISFACTION FROM PARTNERS' DISCUSSION OF THEIR MARRIAGE CHECKUP

Authors


  • Christina B. Gee, Department of Psychology, George Washington University; Rogina, L. Scott and Angela M. Castellani, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois; James V. Cordova, Department of Psychology, Clark University, at the time of the study, all authors were at the Department of Psycholog, University of Illinois.

  • This study was supported in part by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Research Board.

concerning this article should be sent to James V. Cordova, Department of Psychology, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610. E-mail: jcordova@clarku.edu

Abstract

This study tested whether the observed marital interactions of partners follwing a marriage checkup predicted marital satisfaction 2 years later. In addition, this study examined whether recommendations to pursue therapy predicted subsequent treatment seeking and whether changes in marital distress follwing the checkup remained stable over 2 years. Results suggest that the affective tone of a couple's interaction predicts later marital satisfaction. Further, receiving a treatment recommendation predicted subsequent treatment seeking for wives. Finally, support was found for the hypothesis that changes in marital distress are self-sustaining.

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