THE SCIENTIST-PRACTITIONER MODEL IN MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY DOCTORAL PROGRAMS: CURRENT STATUS

Authors


  • D. Russell Crane, Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) Program, Brigham Young University; Karen S. Wampler, MFT Program, Texas Tech University; Douglas H. Sprenkle, MFT Program. Purdue University; Honathan G. Sandberg, MFT Program, Syracuse University; alam J. Hovestadt, Department of Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology. Western Michigan University.

  • This paper is bases on the authors' papers presented as part of the plenary panel address “Current state of the scientist-practioner model in MFT training program,” at the Amerial Association for Marriage and Family Therapy 1999 Research Gonference, July 23, 1999. Chiago, IL.

  • Fred Piercy, a member of the JMFT Editorial Advisory Board, served as action editor for this article.

Correspondence regarding the article should be addressed to D. Russell Crane, MFT Program, Brigham Young University, 274 TLRB, Provo UT 84602. E-mail: Russ_Crane@byu.edu.

Abstract

We discuss the status of the scientist-practitioner model in marriage and family therapy (MFT) doctoral programs. Issues discussed include a lack of faculty research role models in doctoral programs, “farming out” the majority of research courses to other disciplines, problems with curriculum, and how the culture of MFT does not support research. We also present suggestions for improving doctoral research training. The goal is to improve the quality of research training in doctoral programs. We hope that this will help change the culture of MFT to include research as one of its primary goals and greates assets.

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